Landscape oil painting of scene on the Hudson by Bayard Henry Tyler (1855-1931)

Home > Research by Subject > Archaeological Artifacts > Archaeological Artifacts by Date

Archaeological Artifacts by Date

I. 3100-1100 BCE
II. 1000-1 BCE
III. 0-999 CE
IV. 1000-1499 CE

I. 3100-1100 BCE
  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.221
    Date: c. 3100-1800 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: An oil lamp from the Early Bronze Age (3100-1800 BCE). Square shaped with sides folded in. Light terracotta color. Flat bottom. Slightly rough texture. Paper inside reads "MBI." Sticker outside reads "12."

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.222
    Date: c. 3100-1800 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: An oil lamp from the Early Bronze Age (3100-1800 BCE). Mostly creamy white color. Some dark grey coloring on bottom. Heavy. Flat bottom. Slightly rough texture. Piece broken off.

  • Pot
    Object ID: 02.04.172
    Date: c. 1950-1730 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A carinated bowl from the Middle Bronze Age IIA (1950-1730 BCE). Light terracotta-colored and fairly smooth in most places. The rim flares out and the bottom is raised. Twelve small pieces have broken off. One piece has pen writing that says "A,66 TF4-300.1 243 2702."

  • Pot
    Object ID: 02.04.174
    Date: c. 1950-1730 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A terracotta juglet with an ovoid body, single handle and small spout from the Middle Bronze Age IIA (1950-1730 BCE). Light terracotta-colored. Very rough on one side but rough over all. Pointed bottom. Pencil writing on outside.

  • Pot
    Object ID: 02.04.171
    Date: c. 1950-1730 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A terracotta juglet with an ovoid body, single handle and a small spout. Middle Bronze Age IIA (1950-1730 BCE). Top layer is terracotta-colored and rough. Underneath layer is light grey and smooth. Pointed bottom. Uneven top rim.

  • Pot
    Object ID: 02.04.176
    Date: c. 1950-1550 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: Jug from the Middle Bronze Age II (c. 1950-1550 BCE). Light terracotta-colored with dirty white-colored top layer. Rough texture. Flat bottom. Pencil writing on outside.

  • Bowl
    Object ID: 02.04.163
    Date: c. 1850-1550 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A bowl from the Middle Bronze Age II (1850-1550 BCE). Terracotta-colored with creamy grey color in places where it has been chipped. The rim curves in and the bowl is shallow with a flat bottom. There is writing on the outside. Chips along the rim.

  • Pin
    Object ID: 04.13.010
    Date: c. 1750-1650 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A toggle pin. This type of toggle pin occurred during the end of the Middle Bronze Age II B (1750-1650 BCE). Originally it may have been cast in gold and inlaid with precious stone as many of this type were. Often a ring attached to the pin was used to fastedn a scarab seal to the pin- the source of this custom was Mesopotamian. A precise description of it use is given on an ivory inlay from Mari. The pin has a hole in the middle, is pointed at one end and flat and circular on the other. It is made of metal and the coloring is now light green, white, and dark brown.

  • Pot
    Object ID: 02.04.170
    Date: c. 1730-1550 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: This is a carinated bowl from the Middle Bronze Age II B-C (1730-1550 BCE). The bowl is deep and closed with a fairly high neck and a trumpet base. Light terracotta-colored and rough texture. Muddy-looking layer peeling off of outside. Pencil writing on outside.

  • Pot
    Object ID: 02.04.162
    Date: c. 1730-1550 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: This is a carinated bowl from the Middle Bronze Age II B-C (1730-1550 BCE). The bowl is deep and closed with a fairly high neck and trumpet base. Terracotta-colored with a lighter-colored vertical line on the outside. Both the rim and the base flare out. There is pencil writing on the inside. Part of the base may be broken off but the piece is missing. There is a crack on the inside.

  • Pot
    Object ID: 02.04.167
    Date: c. 1730-1550 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: This is a carinated bowl from the Middle Bronze Age II B-C (1730-1550 BCE). The bowl is deep and closed with a fairly high neck and a trumpet base. Light terracotta-colored and fairly smooth. Pen writing on the bottom reads "A,66 Tomb F8 155."

  • Bowl
    Object ID: 02.04.169
    Date: c. 1550-1200 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A bowl from the Late Bronze Age (1550-1200 BCE). Light terracotta-colored with some creamy-white color and greenish-black spots throughout. Mostly smooth with a few rough patches on the lighter-colored parts. Flat bottom. Pencil writing on side.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.218
    Date: c. 1550-1200 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A clay oil lamp from the late Bronze Age (1550-1200 BCE). Mostly terracotta color with black in some places. Fairly smooth Round bottom. Half round, half sides folded in. Letter "H" written on paper and tapped to bottom.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.219
    Date: c. 1200-1100 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: An oil lamp from the early Iron Age (1200-1100 BCE). Mostly terracotta colored with black at spout. Rough texture. Mud colored layer peeling off. Round bottom. Half round, half sides folded in.

II. 1000-1 BCE
  • Pot
    Object ID: 02.04.177
    Date: c. 1000-800 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A terracotta oil juglet from the Iron Age II. (1000-800 BCE). Light terracotta-colored with light brown top layer peeling off. Slightly rough texture. Flat bottom. Pencil writing on outside.

  • Pot
    Object ID: 02.04.168
    Date: c. 1000-800 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A terracotta oil juglet from the Iron Age II (1000-800 BCE). Light terracotta-colored and fairly smooth. Single handle with a flat bottom. Pencil writing on outside. Heavy for size.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.220
    Date: c. 800-536 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: An oil lamp from the Iron Age III (800-536 BCE). Creamy white color on top with terracotta color underneath. Black at spout. Slightly rough texture. Solid, flat bottom. Half round, half sides folded in. Number VI taped to bottom.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.188
    Date: 332-63 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A Hellenistic oil lamp from 332-63 BC. Light terracotta-colored with black at spout. Fairly smooth. Geometric line design with raised bottom. Top and bottom halves look like may have been separate at some point.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.192
    Date: 332-63 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A Hellenistic oil lamp from 336-63 BCE. Red-colored with some light brown. Possible handle or second spout broken off of side. Black at spout. Smooth. Flat bottom. "VII" writte on paper taped to bottom.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.206
    Date: c. 336-63 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A Hellenistic oil lamp from 336-63 BCE. Cream with terracotta color underneath. Black at spout. Flat bottom. Paper inside reads "D8500" with a star of david stamp.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.210
    Date: c. 336-63 BCE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A Hellenistic oil lamp from 336-63 BCE. Purplish light terracotta color. Smooth texture. Black at spout. Sunburst design around filling hole. Lines at bottom base of spout. Looks like leaves at top of spout. Raised bottom. Bottom sticker says "hell(weird)" and another says "1/10".

III. 0-999 CE
  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.202
    Date: c. 0-99 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: Herodic oil lamp from the first century CE. Light terracotta in color with a brownish top layer peeling off. Spout has angular, geometric shape. Rounded-flat bottom. Slightly rough texture. Circular marks on bottom.

  • Bowl
    Object ID: 08.02.084
    Date: 100-300 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: Bowl with rounded base and flaring sides. Burnished polychrome slip. Early to middle Nazca pottery. From Peru. This piece has various colors on it (purple, orange, black, white, gray, tan, brown, red) with a highly polished surface. There are two figures on this bowl, one on each side; they are identical except for their coloring and their plant decorations. The subjects of this piece are feline or otter-like in a serpent like pose with additional plant motifs. It has been suggested that these motifs represent a diety associated with agricultural fertility rituals.

  • Bowl
    Object ID: 08.02.086
    Date: 100-300 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: Early/Middle Nazca bowl with rounded base and flaring sides. Painted with a design of six stepped triangle-and-swirl motifs in black, white, red, brown, and cream colors. Three of the designs are red and three others are brown with all having a central vertical element of cream. Each color area is outlined in black. From Peru.

  • Bowl
    Object ID: 08.02.088
    Date: 100-300 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: This straight-sided Nazca bowl has a burnished polychrome slip decoration. The decorations on the bowl consist of eight stepped-triangle motifs painted in red slip on a dark purple background. Each design is outlined in white. White lines at the top and bottom form a horizontal band for the decoration. From Peru.

  • Bottle
    Object ID: 08.02.082
    Date: 100-500 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: Double Vessel with Whistling Spout, Sea Lion design. Unburnished Gray Ceramic. One chamber of this piece is a bottle with a short spout, joined to the front chamber by a hollow tube and a flat handle. The second chamber is in the form of a sea lion with its face pointed upward. Small whiskers and front flippers of the sea lion are incised on this chamber. The holes in the sea lion's mouth produce a clear whistle when the bottle spout is blown, or when the liquid moves from one chamber to the other. According to Tara Ana Finley, the front section of this "Vicus double chambered grey ware" vessel is "ornamented with a sea lion molded in relief, the face looks to the sky" and on the sides, "the flippers are molded in relief."

  • Pot
    Object ID: 08.02.089
    Date: 200-500 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: This stirrup spout vessel is made of burnished blackware and dates from the Moche IV period, AD 200-500. The shape of this vessel is that of a globular body with a flattened base and a stirrup-shaped spout. The design of this spout allows evaporation but is also very practical with its handle and smooth pouring spout. It has been debated as to whether this type of pottery was developed for practical or ceremonial purposes.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.196
    Date: c. 300-399 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A Jewish Beit Natif type oil lamp from the 4th century CE. Light terracotta-colored with darker terracotta in some places. Geometric design but mostly rubbed off. Raised bottom. Fairly smooth. Top and bottom halves look like separate at some point. Pen writing on botom reads "A,66 Tomb F4 300.3 3643."

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.215
    Date: c. 300-399 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A Jewish Beit-Natif type oil lamp from the 4th century. Light terracotta colored with dark-reddish terracotta color in some places. Slightly rough texture. Design on top mostly rubbed off. Raised bottom.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.217
    Date: c. 300-599 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: An oil lamp from the 4th-6th century AD. Light terracotta color. Black at spout. Geometric line design with cross on front. Flat bottom. Fairly smooth texture.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.194
    Date: c. 330-630 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A Byzantine oil lamp from 330-630 CE. Light terracotta-colored with black at spout. Slightly rough texture. Geometric design of lines and circles. Flat, boat-like bottom.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.197
    Date: c. 330-630 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A Byzantine oil lamp from 330-630 CE. Creamy white color underneath and black at spout. Geometric design. Slightly rough texture. Raised bottom. Sticker inside reads "By3."

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.204
    Date: c. 330-630 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A Byzantine oil lamp from 330-630 CE. Light and dark terracotta colored. Black at spout. Geometric design of lines and circles. Slightly rough texture. Piece of handle missing. Boat-like bottom.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.208
    Date: c. 330-630 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A Byzantine oil lamp from 330-630 AD. Terracotta and grey colored. Geometric design. Boat-like bottom. Slightly rough texture. Heavy for size.

  • Pot
    Object ID: 02.04.173
    Date: c. 330-640 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A bowl from the Byzantine Period (330-640 AD). Light terracotta-colored with grey inside layer on edges where broken. Slightly rough texture. Round bottom.

  • Pot
    Object ID: 02.04.166
    Date: c. 330-650 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A bowl from the Byzantine Period (330-640 CE). Creamy-brown color with possible lines on the sides. Very rough. Small vase-shaped with a rounded bottom and a slightly flared rim. Pencil writing on the outside.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.190
    Date: 350-550 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A 'Small Candlestick Lamp' from the second half of the 4th century to mid-6th century. Also called 'small slipper lamps', 'small radiated lamps' or 'Ain Yabrud lamps'. Oval in shape, low circular ring base, medium-sized filling hole. Light terracotta-colored with brown spots on side and black at spout. Geometric design with cross on front. Raised bottom. Fairly smooth.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.201
    Date: c. 350-550 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A 'Small Candlestick Lamp' from the second half of the 4th century to mid-6th century. Also known as 'small slipper lamps,' 'small radiated lamps,' and 'Ain Yabrud lamps.' Oval in shape, low circular base, and medium-sized filling hole. light terracotta-colored with black at spout. Geometric, leaf-like design. Raised bottom. Fairly smooth. Sticker on bottom reads "By3." Sticker inside reads "Bizantine (46)45."

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.207
    Date: c. 350-550 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A Byzantine oil lamp from the late 4th century to mid-6th century CE. Terracotta colored. Multiple layers. Black at spout. Geometric design. Slightly rough texture. Raised bottom. Roman numeral V taped to bottom.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.214
    Date: c. 350-550 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A 'Small Candletick Lamp' from the late 4th century to the mid-6th century AD. Light terracotta color with darker terracotta underneath. Black at spout. Geometric design with cross on front. Raised bottom. Slightly rough texture.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.209
    Date: c. 400-499 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: An oil lamp from the 5th century. Reddish-terracotta colored. Smooth texture. Black spots in various places. Geometric design. Raised bottom. Design on bottom with circles inside diamond. Roman numeral IV taped to bottom.

  • Pot
    Object ID: 08.02.079
    Date: 400-600 CE
    Origin: Bolivia
    Description: Tiahuanaco vessel. "Kero" shaped. According to the appraisal by Tara Ana Finley, this Tiahuanaco Terracotta vessel, circa 400-600 AD is of kero shape, the exterior rim with a band of stylized stepped and linear motifs painted in shades of white and burgundy.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.200
    Date: c. 400-699 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: An oil lamp from the 5th-7th century CE. Probably had a cross on fron t before chipped off. Light terracotta color with dark grey layer underneath. Black at spout. Fairly smooth testure. Geometric line design. Raised bottom. On botto, "A,66 Tomb F4 300.3 3.659" written in pain.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.216
    Date: c. 400-699 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: An oil lamp from the 5th-7th century AD. Light terracotta color with darker terracotta underneath. Black at spout. Geometric design with cross on front. Raised bottom. Fairly smooth texture. Roman numeral II taped to bottom.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.198
    Date: c. 500-699 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A Byzantine oil lamp from the 6th-7th century CE. Light terracotta-colored with black at spout. Angular shape and geometric design. Fairly smooth. Raised bottom.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.205
    Date: c. 500-699 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A Byzantine oil lamp from the 6th-7th century CE. Light terracotta color. Geometric design. Angular shape. Raised bottom. Black at spout. Slightly rough texture.

  • Bead
    Object ID: 03.01.008
    Date: 500-1476 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: Most of these clay beads have relief carvings on them. The colors of the beads vary from buff to red to black. It is unknown whether these beads were part of a set; they are now strung on a modern brown rope. Several of the beads were burnished to a high shine prior to the relief carving. Nine of these clay beads have been carved with interlocking bird designs. There are twelve total. The motifs are similar to those found in Chimu goldwork, and on the reliefs carved on the clay walls of Chan Chan, the great Chimu city on the north coast of Peru. The birds have the long necks and long bills of water birds that inhabit the coast.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.189
    Date: 600-699 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A Byzantine oil lamp from the 7th century CE. Light terracotta-colored and black at spout. Geometric design with cross at front. Raised bottom. Fairly smooth.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.193
    Date: c. 600-699 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A Byzantine oil lamp from the 7th century CE. Terracotta-colored with black at spout. Slightly rough texture. Geometric line design with cross on front. Raised bottom. Looks like top and bottom halves separate at some point.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.203
    Date: c. 600-699 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: A Byzantine oil lamp from the 7th century CE. Mostly light terracotta color with dark terracotta underneath top layer. Black at spout. Geometric, line design. Raised bottom. Slightly rough texture. Heavy.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.212
    Date: c. 600-699 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: An oil lamp from around the 7th century AD. Mostly terracotta colored with some creamy white, especially on bottom. Slightly rough texture. Geometric line design with a cross on the back. Raised bottom.

  • Lamp, Oil
    Object ID: 02.05.213
    Date: c. 600-699 CE
    Origin: Middle East
    Description: An oil lamp from the 7th century. Light terracotta color with black around hole. Geometrical design on top. Vertical handle on top. Raise bottom with three cross: one large cross with a smaller cross on each side. This design on the bottom may be a "maker's mark".

  • Pot
    Object ID: 08.02.291
    Date: 600-1000 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: Terracotta beaker or cup with three undulating ribs and registers of painting on the upper side of each rib. Red burnished ground with three tiers, each with white slip ground with black geometric design. From Peru.

  • Spindle
    Object ID: 04.13.003
    Date: 800-1500 CE
    Origin: probably Peru
    Description: 1 of 5 spindles. These are probably from Coastal Peru and were used to spin cotton and camelid fibers into yarn. One of the spindles still has brown cotton yarn attached to it. All of the spindles have been decorated with incised designs, the most elaborate one with red, white, and yellow painted geometric motifs. Dates from 800 to 1500 AD.

  • Pot
    Object ID: 08.02.098
    Date: 800-1000 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: Chimu greyware spouted terracotta cessel molded in the form of a seated male figure, wears an elaborate cape, holds wand in left hand, right hand to the knee, and a bulbous headdress as spout, with hard pulled to the back of the neck. From Peru.

  • Pot
    Object ID: 08.02.099
    Date: 800-1200 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: Chimu terracotta stirrup vessel molded in the form of stylized face at the spout, incised patterns on shoulder indicating the shirt, traces of white pigment at the spout, strap handle at the back. From Peru.

  • Pot
    Object ID: 08.02.077
    Date: c. 800-1200 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: Inca pot According to the appraisal by Tara Ana Finley, this Inca Terracotta vessel, circa 800-1200 AD, has deeply flared sides, the exterior shoulder, rim and neck with six encircling bands of geometric designs comprising stepped motifs, inverted triangles and horizontal bands ornamented in shades of black, brick, and cream on terracotta ground. An old collection number of 765/x252 is located on the bottom of the piece.

  • Pot
    Object ID: 08.02.096
    Date: 800-1200 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: Small terracotta bowl with flared sides, the interior with painted linear and circular motifs painted with white, orange, and black on a terracotta ground. Possibly Ica in origin, from Peru.

  • Pot
    Object ID: 08.02.097
    Date: 800-1200 CE
    Origin: Costa Rica
    Description: Anthropomorphic greyware vessel in the form of a seat deity with a tapered headdress as spout. From Costa Rica.

  • Pot
    Object ID: 08.02.101
    Date: 800-1200
    Origin: Peru
    Description: Terracotta cup or beaker with two rectangular bands of modled design in form of serpents. From Peru.

IV. 1000-1499 CE
  • Bag
    Object ID: 07.01.004
    Date: 1000-1400 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: That this bag played an important role in the life of its owner is evidenced by its intricate construction method of double cloth. In this technique, two pieces of cloth of different colors are woven simultaneously, back to back. The warp and weft yarns of one cloth are exchanged with those of the other cloth to form the design. The result is a fabric two layers thick whose design is the same on both sides except that the colors are reversed. In this piece, the white yarns of the under layer come to the surface of the blue cloth to form the design of six faces. The faces have elongated rectangular mouths, square eyes, and a triangular point for the top of the head. The faces have the appearance of death, so the representation may indicate trophy heads or mummy masks.

  • Figurine
    Object ID: 08.02.074
    Date: 1000-1400 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: Ceramic vessel with the body of square form, sumounted by a seated figure with one hand held to the stomach and the other hand held to the head. Chimu.

  • Cloth Fragment
    Object ID: 10.01.007
    Date: 1000-1470 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: This plain weave brown cotton fragment has a supplementary camelid fiber weft and dates from AD 1000-1470. From coastal Peru the original length of this piece is unknown. Two extra camelid fiber weft yarns of pint and gold were also woven into the cloth in a decorative pattern. These two supplementary wefts can cross any number of warps required for the design. When not needed on the surface, they "float" on the reverse side of the fabric. This technique is known as brocade. The design formed here is of interlocking stylized pelicans and geometric motifs. From coastal Peru.

  • Pot
    Object ID: 08.02.095
    Date: 1000-1470 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: Small terracotta bowl with flared sides, the interior with painted linear and circular motifs painted with white, orange, and black on a terracotta ground. Possibly Ica in origin, from Peru.

  • Tapestry
    Object ID: 08.02.250
    Date: 1000-1400
    Origin: Peru
    Description: This slit tapestry band or sash fragment has tassels at one end and a cotton warp and a camelid fiber warp. This piece could have been used as a belt for the waist or as a headband to be wound around the head of a mummy bundle, as many headbands were made just for this purpose. The slit tapestry technique is the method of construction, with the small openings left between color areas quite evident. The small side tassels were formed by extending a group of wefts beyond the last warp. Characteristic Central Coast colors of pinks and golds form the design motif of interlocking stepped triangles. From the central coast of Peru.

  • Pot
    Object ID: 08.02.091
    Date: 1000-1476 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: This burnished Chimu blackware vessel has the design of a copulating human couple. The couple shares a common eye. Incised lines indicate the hair of the female. The male probably wears a headdress, as evidenced by the cone shaped of the top of the head and by the incised line around the head. The stylized almond-shaped eyes are characteristic of the faces in Chimu art. From Peru. This vessel, like most Chimu pottery, was made in the mold. The ridges of mold seams and marks of the tool used to clean the seams can been seen at each end of the vessel. The subject matter is a common theme throughout Peruvian art, especially in the coastal areas. A short growing season caused the coastal cultures to be very concerned about fertility. They had strong fertility beliefs and rituals, not only about plants and animals, but humans as well.

  • Sword, Weaving
    Object ID: 04.13.008
    Date: 1000-1476 CE
    Origin:
    Description: 2.81.8 Wooden weaving sword. Typically inserted between the warp threads on the loom and used to compact the weft threads or to separate alternate warp threads for the insertion of the weft threads. This sword has a flatten oval shape with one end pointed and the other end carved. There are two weaving swords total, but this one is more elaborate in its design. The head of a bird with its beak pointed down has a five-rayed crest or headdress. below the bird's head is a band of two interlocking stepped-triangle and swirl motifs. The same design is on the other side, with the bird head facing the opposite direction.

  • Bowl
    Object ID: 08.02.092
    Date: 1100-1300 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: This Ica bowl consists of a black and white slip on red clay. This bowl has inward slanting sides with a design of interlocking lines and dots on the sides. This bowl is very characteristic of Ica pottery in that its sides are slanting and the narrow band of geometric motifs painted around the vessel. The Ica culture flourished in the Ica valley on the south coast of Peru from about AD 1100 until it was conquered and absorbed by the Inca Empire around AD 1470. The Ica must have placed great emphasis on trading because Ica pottery has been found in coastal sites far to the north and highland sites to the east.

  • Bowl
    Object ID: 08.02.093
    Date: 1100-1300 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: This Ica bowl has red, white, and black slip decorations with the characteristic geometric designs on it. The outside of the bowl was covered in red slip first and then the white lines and dots were added. The dots were done in very think clip, for many of them form a raised bump on the surface of the bowl. Finally, the white lines and dots were outlined in black.The black outlines have a sketchy quality, as if they were done quickly. Some of them have missed the edge of the white line altogether. The white dots have been outlined not with a circle of black, but by four overlapping black lines, forming a square. This is quite different from the precisely drawn interlocking lines and dots on the other Ica bowl of similar shape in this collection.

  • Lace Fragment
    Object ID: 10.01.016
    Date: 1100-1400 CE
    Origin:
    Description: Lace remnant According to the appraisal by Tara Ana Finley, this small Chancay gauze textile fragment, circa 1100-1400 AD, contains a large section of openwork design interspersed with small flowerettes. This particular appraisal was made from a photograph as the piece was missing before Finley appraised the collection.

  • Bottle
    Object ID: 08.02.094
    Date: 1100-1470 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: This unburnished blackware drum bottle is named because of its shape: a slightly bulging cylindrical body with flattened ends. The shape resembles a pre-Columbian Peruvian drum. The slighly flaring spout of this piece has a small ridge where it joins the body of the vessel. Two lug handles are placed on each side of the spout in a transverse direction to the axis of the body. From Peru. Chords can be attached to the handles for easy carrying. The origin of this vessel is difficult to determine since the drum bottle shape was used by several cultures, including the Ica on the south coast and the Inca in the highlands and on the coast.

  • Bag
    Object ID: 07.01.002
    Date: 1200-1400 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: The coca bag, or chuspa, served in pre-Columbian Peru as it does today as a carrying device for the leaves of the coca plant. These leaves when chewed with lime, act as a mild stimulant and also counteract the effects of high altitude sickness, such as headache and shortness of breath. It is still used by the inhabitants of the Andean highlands. This bag is constructed of white cotton plain weave. The design is formed by the dark blue camelid fiber supplementary weft added during the course of weaving. The motif consists of diagonal rows of interlocked stylizes faces, resembling the feline face motif used by many of the pre-Columbian Peruvian cultures. Hanging from the bag are three red and gold tassels; they were made by twisting or plying strands of human hair as if they were yarns, winding them into a ball and then embroidered the ball of spirals of red and gold. The tassels were attached to the bag by a plied strand of hair wrapped in red and gold yarns. Seven tiny feathers of white, yellow, orange, gray, and iridescent blue adhere to the body of the bag. The colors chosen for the tassels and the construction of the shoulder strap, identical to other known examples, indicate that this bag may have come from the Chancay Valley of the central coast.

  • Loincloth
    Object ID: 10.01.021
    Date: 1200-1400 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: Partial panel from a Chancay loincloth that has a tapestry weave with cotton warps and camelid fiber wefts. In this type of weave, the warp or vertical threads are so far outnumbered by the weft or horizontal threads that the warps are completely hidden. In this piece the weft threads cross the warp as many as 132 times in the space of an inch. Also there are several yarns of different colors, each of them crossing only a limited number of warp yarns before turning back upon itself. The color areas are like small distinct sections of weaving, yet are all done on the same warp. This piece is also characterized by a technique called slit tapestry, which is when small openings are left between the color areas. The warp yards are cotton and the weft yarns are camelid fiber. The camelid fiber fringe is woven separately and sewn on with overcast stitching. The design on this piece consists of a central field of light gold surrounded by a series of red and gold stripes, a band of birds, and another series of red and gold stripes. The birds are shown in profile, with beak, head, eye, tail, and one leg, but no wing. The sequence of colors used in the body of the bird is consistently white, red, gold, red. All red birds have a white beak and white eye with a black pupil. All white birds have a red beak and red eye with a black pupil. All gold birds have a red beak and black eye with white pupil except one gold bird at the center of the left edge of the textile, which has a red pupil. From Peru. This piece was probably the front panel of a loincloth that had been cut by grave looters who were hunting for and selling fragments of Peru's archaeological treasures.

  • Belt
    Object ID: 03.02.002
    Date: 1470-1532 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: Incan belt or girth made of camelid fiber and cotton. This textile is said to have come from the Inca culture that developed in the Peruvian highlands in the 1400s. This piece appears to be the girth strap used to hold a pack-load on a llama. This consists of very thickly woven wool with wooden bards reinforcing the ends. The warp pattern design forms rows of stylized fish, usually a coastal motif also found in textiles of the Chancay valley which was conquered by the Inca around 1470.

  • Belt
    Object ID: 03.02.006
    Date: 1470-1532 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: Incan girth made of vegetable fiber weft and camelid fiber warp. This piece has a heavy weft that appears to be a non-cotton vegetable fiber similar to that used by the pre-Columbian Peruvians to form the soles of sandals. The weft is completely covered by the heavy 8-ply yarns of the warp. Wooden bars reinforce the warp ends. The colors red and black are found often in Inca textiles. The design pattern is a perfect illustration of the pan-Peruvian stepped triangle-and-swirl motif. This piece may have been the girth strap for a llame pack-load, although it appears a bit short for that purpose.

  • Cloth Fragment
    Object ID: 10.01.012
    Date: 1470-1532 CE
    Origin: Peru
    Description: This plain weave cotton square with ties is from coastal Peru. The three colors of the cotton yarn used here (white, gray, brown) form a plaid pattern. This piece has three tiny feathers adhering to it (white, yellow, and iridescent blue). This may have been used as a carrying bag because the cloth would form a type of pouch if the ties were tied together. Another function could have been to tie the fabric to another object, perhaps the head or face of a mummy bundle.

Last updated: March 1, 2013